• ACER-GAMSAT must update their COVID and Extenuating Circumstances Policy
    Entry into Med School is a year-long process, starting with the GAMSAT. The COVID Pandemic has been ever-present since March 2020, yet in two years, ACER has not made adequate accomodations to address this issue. Countless Australians also had to deal with additional ongoing crises in the weeks surrounding GAMSAT as Australia experienced record breaking flooding on the East coast. Remote Proctoring has been offered in an incredibly limited capacity, with numerous candidates being informed that their only option is to defer their GAMSAT sitting. As such, countless candidates are being forced to delay their applications for Medical schools for a year. ACER, this is an inadequate response to the COVID Pandemic and also highlights the flaws in your extenuating circumstances policy. Your inability to provide adequate numbers of remote proctors or provide a back-up testing slot for candidates is a failure to the medical industry.
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    Created by Mallory Ledger
  • Renewables not Gas for East Gippsland
    Gas is a dangerous, polluting fossil fuel. It releases greenhouse gasses that contribute to the horrific bushfires and raging floods we’ve seen devastate communities across the country in recent years. And it isn’t just a disaster for our climate. It’s also bad for our health. Public health experts are concerned about the health risks of cooking with gas in our homes, which can have a similar impact on childhood asthma as living with cigarette smoke. And here in Victoria, we burn more gas per person than any other state. But the good news is that some local councils around the country are bowing to community pressure and taking matters into their own hands - promising to end new gas connections, and help people with the cost of switching to electricity and renewables. And with enough pressure from the community, our local council could join this movement today!
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    Created by Shane Elmore
  • Bus: Lindfield Learning Village; Chatswood West
    Until March 2021 kids in Chatswood West were in area for Chatswood Highschool - 20 min walk away. Now our local school is the Lindfield Learning Village. Two bus rides and a walk taking at least an hour, if you don’t miss your connection. Transport for NSW have suggested a walking path through the bush. This is not safe or practical with laptops and musical instruments. We’re excited to go to LLV, but we’d like to get there in under half an hour with a direct bus route. Given the school boundary changes were outside of our control and only announced at the last minute, we request a bus route for our kids that makes the school run quick, direct and safe.
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    Created by Jen Coleman
  • Safe Streets to School in Canberra
    Children in the ACT deserve to safely walk or ride to school (or to public transport to get to school). Walking or riding to school improves children's fitness and independence. However, they are often driven over short distances to school because parents perceive that their child's journey to school is unsafe for part or the whole of the journey. As a result, our streets are subject to tens of thousands more car trips every year, making them even less safe and clogging up roads with unnecessary traffic during morning drop-off and afternoon pick-up. Streets without footpaths and crossings with speed limits higher than 30km/h are not considered safe under the Safe System approach used in Australia and the ACT. The Safe System approach is the basis for and at the heart of all ACT Government transport policy making and efforts to improve road safety and achieve Vision Zero for deaths and serious injuries on our roads. Why we need Safe Streets to School: - Research shows that children cannot judge gaps in traffic consistently when cars go faster than 30km/h to safely cross a street - On streets where there are no footpaths and crossings, reducing the car speed to 30km/h would prevent most accidents: the stopping distance for a car traveling 30km/h is 13m. Stopping distance for a car traveling 50km/h is 37m. The risk of death or serious injury if hit at 30km/h is less than 10%; compared to 90% if hit at 50km/h. It is an unreasonable risk to place our children in harms way on their journey to school. Safe Streets to School will help: - achieve each of the four goals of the ACT Road Safety Strategy 2020-2025 - make Canberra a healthy, active and inclusive city, including being Australia’s most walkable city - the ACT reach its legislated target of zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2045, because it will help people if they feel safe enough to choose active travel and so reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transport. Our children deserve the right to walk to school (or public transport to get to school), so they can have a healthy and safe future. We do not believe it is fair to wait for an accident to happen and our children to get injured or killed before they can walk or ride safely. Please make our streets to school safe now.
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    Created by Gillian King
  • Education for Sustainability for All
    Forty years ago, the Australian Association for Environmental Education (AAEE) was formed to champion education reforms (Education for Sustainability is the latest term to describe that) focused on positively connecting students with nature, developing critical thinking and analytical skills and empowering them to help develop solutions to our human induced environmental problems. Now, we need an education revolution to save the planet. In Our campaign supports other international campaigns to develop grassroots support and on the ground efforts by students, educators, and civil society to demand national level commitments from Ministries of Education and Environment. Through this campaign, we will ensure that students in Australia and across the world benefit from high-quality education to develop into informed and engaged environmental stewards. AAEE believes that every school in the world must have compulsory, assessed climate and environmental education with a strong civic engagement component focused on achieving a sustainable society.
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    Created by Stephen Fuller
  • Safe Streets to school in the Inner West
    The council can make a big difference to support active travel. All students living and learning in the Inner West should be able to travel safely to and from school. The streets should encourage them to walk, ride, skate, and roll with friends, without fear of motorised vehicles. We should have the infrastructure and rules in place in the Inner West to ensure that all students can travel safely, have fun and be active, every day. Safe streets to school are better for kids, the community and the environment. Streets without footpaths and crossings with speed limits higher than 30km/h are not considered safe by Australia's safe system approach. The Case for crossings: Research shows that children cannot judge gaps in traffic consistently when cars go faster than 30km/h to safely cross a street On streets where there are no footpaths and crossings, reducing the car speed to 30km/h would prevent most accidents: the stopping distance for a car traveling 30km/h is 13m. Stopping distance for a car traveling 50km/h is 37m. The risk of death or serious injury if hit at 30km/h is less than 10%; compared to 90% if hit at 50km/h. It is an unreasonable risk to place our children in harms way on their journey to school.
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    Created by Bridget Foley Picture
  • Remove sugar filled toxic “foods” from Palm Beach tuck shop and bring back allergy friendly options
    Our children’s developing minds and bodies are something to be nourished and nurtured. By riddling their bodies with sugar, additives, preservatives and colourings is EXTREMELY detrimental to their ability to learn and concentrate. This is backed by years of scientific literature showing the behavioural developmental delays and outbursts that these additives do to our children. Sugar is more addictive then illicit drugs and causes immense destruction to growing bodies and brains. A treat every now and then is a wonderful part of life but it’s wildly concerning for a learning environment to offer and suggest these “foods” as appropriate for consumption every single day to children as young as 4 years old. Our school is our main community and something we should be so proud of and always were. This new change is extremely disappointing and terribly concerning. The consent to our children consuming these junk items daily causing behavioural and physical issues in or children is not something we give! We are asking for the removal of these known detrimental junk items from the school menu and to include more allergy friendly and wholesome food - just like the previous menu options provided.
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    Created by Paris Lucas
  • Mental Health Long Weekends during online schooling
    I am sure so many children doing online school right now would agree a 3 day weekend would be good all year round but I think it is possible whilst doing online school. On the 2nd of August, there was the highest number of calls made to the lifeline support in 58 years of 3 345 calls. Especially through these rough times, people deserve a break and maybe even adults would need a 3 day weekend during these times too.
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    Created by Chelsea Wright
  • Education for students struggling academically
    Not all children learn at the same pace, it’s important that these children who are struggling academically to be able to attend a school locally that offers alternative education
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    Created by Franca Di Pasquale
  • Save Kuluin OSHC From Being Outsourced!
    Kuluin OSHC is an award-winning OSHC and it is an outrage that the P & C want to outsource this to a corporate entity. Pam, Josh and the team at Kuluin OSHC have created a safe and happy place for our children and outsourcing it would be absolutely devastating for the children and families.
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    Created by Kristy Neal
  • More beds for Odyssey House Molyullah
    Addiction is a disease that affects not only the addict but their parents, siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles, friends etc. Without rehabilitation centres addicts will continue to die. At the moment there are 80-100 people waiting for a bed every week. Addicts walk beside us every day sometimes visibly struggling with life but on many occasions there are no visible signs of the struggle within. We can no longer put our head in the sand and pretend this isn't an issue. If this expansion saves one life it is worth it.
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    Created by Amanda Joyce
  • HSC for Connor Meldrum 2021
    Two years ago, Connor fell 25m onto rocks at the base of the cliff at Cosy Corner Miraculously, Connor’s life was saved but he suffered a severe traumatic brain injury. Connor had to learn to speak, read and write all over again and amazed his doctors and teachers with his recovery. Later that year, he was back at school and went on to complete Year 10, 11 and term 1 of Year 12. He worked incredibly hard over this time to catch up. In January this year, Connor had to undergo an unexpected emergency operation to remove his skull plate. This was a terrible setback after so much hard work and was very frightening for Connor, his family and friends. After weeks in hospital he re-joined Year 12 at school. Due to fatigue and frequent headaches, Connor is on a reduced work load managing 3 subjects out of the 5 needed to complete the HSC. He will also have to undergo two further surgeries this year in August / September. What we really want is for Connor to be able to complete his HSC in 2021. Connor has been denied any special considerations from NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) meaning he is unable to complete his HSC this year with his friends. Despite evidence of his academic record, the reports of his teachers and examples of other students with illnesses who have been given special considerations to complete their HSC, NESA simply ruled out any option for him to complete his HSC in 2021 “because it would be unfair on other students”. Connor has worked very hard to be able to complete his HSC this year. He has spoken about the effects that this setback has had on his mental health, and how it would affect him if he isn’t able to graduate with his cohort. This is where you can help. Sign this petition to send a message to NESA that his peers and supporters believe there should be special considerations for Connor to complete his HSC in 2021. Thank you for your support! Bronte, Ivy, Kai, Lily and Luka For a longer version of Connor's story click on the Campaign Website link below.
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    Created by Rebecca Kocass