• Save Our Broadwater - Stop ASF before it is too late!
    The Broadwater is a social, environmental and economic asset to our city which locals and tourists alike use and love, and we do not want its natural beauty and character destroyed by high density urban development or a ship terminal. The development proposed will entail millions of m3 of dredging which will destroy the habitat for dugongs, dolphins. migratory birds and over 450 species of marine life in the Gold Coast Seaway. Proposals to construct a huge development for 15,000 people mid Broadwater will create a visual abomination and severely impact upon traffic, infrastructure and population in adjacent suburbs like Southport, Labrador and Runaway Bay, leading to the M1. Finally, the community loves and uses its magnificent Broadwater and islands as its boating, swimming, sailing, fishing and recreational heart. This development will destroy this freedom and privilege, and change the beautiful face of our city forever. ASF can construct its development on private land it purchases like every other developer who invests in our city. We do not need to sell off precious public open space and waterways to attract investment. Further, the Broadwater as a shallow estuary of great environmental significance, is completely inappropriate for a ship terminal and consideration should be given both to extensive scientific research into offshore options and to optimising passenger shore visits from terminals constructed in Brisbane.
    12,213 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Save Our Broadwater Inc
  • Revoke the NSW Shark Meshing Program
    The shark meshing program (SMP) is a lethal shark mitigation policy that has been in place since 1937 in NSW. It is managed by the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) fisheries NSW and contractors (fishers) carry out the program. The nets are set on 51 most popular beaches from Newcastle to Wollongong. The nets are 150m long and 6m high and are set in 10-12 metres of water. Sharks are able to swim over them and around them. The nets are random and indiscriminate killers of marine life and it is reported that 17,000 marine animals have been caught in shark nets in NSW although NSW Fisheries dept reports state that this figure is an underestimation of total numbers of animals caught due to poor historical data collection. The nets do not keep people safe from sharks. Shark / human interactions have occurred on beaches where shark nets are in place. The 2009 DPI fisheries review into the SMP stated that “the rate of shark attack has remained the same both before and after meshing commenced”. In contradiction to this the DPI fisheries NSW has claimed that “the SMP has been effective at providing a safer environment for swimmers”. However the NSW fisheries scientific committee (FSC) which is tasked with critiquing the program from a scientific standpoint has stated that “this statement is unsubstantiated because it is not based on a scientific comparison between meshed and unmeshed beaches, of shark numbers, interactions or attacks, the FSC requests that the SMP remove the statement" from the previous four annual reports of the SMP which it has failed to do. Fatal shark incidents are tragic events however with increasing medical technology and quick response first aid the vast majority of shark incidents are survivable – this was not the case back in the 1930’s when the NSW program was first put in place. We believe that the low numbers of shark bite fatalities on meshed beaches is more likely to be attributable to the presence of lifeguards who are able to detect sharks, close beaches and provide fast medical assistance in the event of a shark incident. Sharks are in their natural habitat and statistically the chances of being bitten by one are extremely low. Sharks kill on average 5 people worldwide per year, however people kill over 100 million sharks per year. Many of the animals caught in beach nets are now considered endangered as such the SMP is now listed as a key threatening process for the following marine animals: humpback, minke and southern right whales, Australian fur seals, dugongs and three species of endangered marine turtles, critically endangered grey nurse sharks and vulnerable great white sharks. Killing endangered animals in their ocean home for the purposes of increasing the safety to people who are visitors is unacceptable in this day and age. A federal Australian Government environment department report in 2005 titled ‘Death or injury to marine species following capture in beach meshing (nets) and drumlines used in shark control programs’ lists some 99 species of marine animal who have been victims of shark control programs, of these 99 species 73% are now listed on the IUCN red-list as near threatened, vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered or are classified as data deficient, or not assessed yet so we don't know if they too belong on the red-list. As animals and ecosystems face increasing environmental pressures, governments are obligated to ensure programs which threaten vulnerable and endangered species are replaced by less harmful measures to ensure human safety. noNSWsharkcull is campaigning for the removal of shark nets in NSW as these programs are outdated, and have not been demonstrated to make the ocean safer for people. We instead support public education in how to minimise chances of shark bite and scientific research into the tagging and tracking of sharks as alternative means to reduce the chances of shark bite incidents. We also support research into other non-lethal methods of shark mitigation. These methods will reduce the harm to our many endangered and vulnerable marine species including sharks, turtles, whales and dolphins who belong in the ocean and are fighting for their survival. We should be doing everything possible to protect marine ecosystems as they are more fragile than ever. We need shark control methods that make the ocean safer for people and marine animals including sharks. Sharks as apex predators are vital for the health of the ocean, without sharks scientists predict that the entire ocean ecosystem will collapse. The phytoplankton in the ocean provides up to 70% of the oxygen on the planet for this reason we need to keep our ocean ecosystems in balance. Healthy oceans need sharks and if the oceans die we die.
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    Created by Sharnie Connell
  • Restore Lake Pedder
    Lake Pedder was the most beautiful and extraordinary lake in the world, with a beach that was 3km long and in summer grew to be up to 600m wide, and rugged mountains all around. The most extraordinary feature of the beach however was its amazing herring bone pattern, giving it the appearance of a gigantic golden comb. Were the lake to be restored, if appropriate tourist facilities were provided there would be the potential for a lot of money flowing into the state, greatly benefiting Tasmania's economy, as Lake Pedder was one of the world's greatest natural wonders.
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    Created by allan starr
  • Stop Toxic Waste being dumped at the Lyndhurst Landfill
    This will ensure alternative treatments to landfill for higher hazard waste are appropriately researched, monitored and implemented. This will also ensure that there are no (detrimental) health impacts to the residents in the surrounding area of Lyndhurst.
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    Created by VASILIOS TOURLOUPIS
  • Allow Verge Gardens in Geelong
    Curb-side planting of low growing, edible and decorative plants enhances household sustainability, builds community and enriches both people and neighbourhoods. As Costa Georgiadis, the host of Gardening Australia says: “It is not just about food for humans, verge gardens grow habitat for birds and insects and provide a home for the pollinators and ecosystem supporters that look after us and our food plants as well. And above all else, they build and grow connections and community.”
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    Created by Geelong Sustainability Group Picture
  • Preserve Western Port - Stop the Development of Port of Hastings
    The expansion to accommodate a projected 3000 ships per year will involve massive dredging, dumping of dredge spoil, land reclamation, risk of oil spills, air pollution, beach and cliff erosion associated with channel deepening, and loss of habitat. This has the potential to destroy the Western Port we know, love, and depend upon. Our beaches, fishing, wildlife, tourism economy, clean air, clean water. Western Port is a wetland of international significance, and Australia has obligations to look after it under the Ramsar treaty. Please take some time to learn about the proposed port expansion and its likely impacts. To stay up to date visit http://preservewesternport.org.au and http://www.wppcinc.org Thanks!
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    Created by Joanna Johnson
  • Carbon Tax Repeal Laws to Lead to Job Losses
    The carbon tax legislation has lead to the development of new business opportunities in green industries and sustainable business models. Repealing the carbon tax will lead to job losses in the new green economy. We need to demonstrate to the government and the community the impact that repealing the carbon tax will have on new green businesses. Green business is just as important to the economy as dirty business.
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    Created by Daniel Wurm
  • Save the heritage Cork Tree in Norwood, Adelaide, South Australia
    This tree was planted in 1892 by prominent industrialist Henry Buttery in his residential property adjacent to his furniture factory, which was the first in South Australia to use steam powered machinery, and the nearby row of Victorian shops from 158 to 166 The Parade, which still retain their distinctive parapets and facades and were also built by Henry Buttery. The tree and the shops represent the cultural history of late 19th Century Norwood. The cork tree (quercus suber) is significant with respect to its species, trunk size and its age. It is of exceptional form, with a good crown and contributes to the interpretation and understanding of the important history and built heritage of the site. It is registered by the National Trust of Australia (No. 34) on the Significant Tree Register.
    1,370 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Anne Chappel
  • Wonthaggi Cemetery Save and Preserve
    We want to be proud of the Wonthaggi Public Cemetery's historic grounds and the very special areas in which to honour and celebrate life. We need the grounds to be kept in pristine condition all year round for safe access to and from grave sites for all population groups including senior citizens and members of the public with a disability - even people with an injury or temporary disability.
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    Created by Les Larke
  • Deputy PM - Please Champion the safety of Those who Are Vulnerable on our roads
    With over 30,000 Australians killed or seriously injured each year, road safety is a health issue! Yet basic actions can be taken to protect people's lives! As part of Australia's Road Rules we need a national law that acts to protect those who find themselves vulnerable on our roads and highways. By making sure that passing drivers and riders "slow down and move over" when approaching an incident, crash or breakdown we can ensure road users "Drive So Others Survive!" (See Centre for Road Safety Video www.youtube.com/watch?v=H75mP0X41Gw ) There is no longer a Commonwealth Minister for Road Safety so we are asking the Deputy Prime Minister (who is also Minister for Transport and Infrastructure) to become the champion for National Road Safety. Given his portfolio responsibilities, we believe the Deputy Prime Minister needs to become the National Road Safety Champion by publicly stating his commitment to road safety. We then ask the Deputy Prime Minister to demonstrate this commitment to the protection of vulnerable road users and those who protect and assist (emergency services, tow truck drivers, roadside assistance personnel) by leading the push for a "Slow By at least 30" (SB30) Australian Road Rule.
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    Created by Peter Frazer Picture
  • Save Barrow Island
    Chevron is guilty of oil leaks and spills on and around the island. In the following link you can see images of leaking oil pipes: http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/leaking-pipes-spill-oil-across-barrow-island/story-e6frg19l-1226067138923 What is the fate of animals relocated from Barrow Island? Read about it here: http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/mammals-moved-to-radioactive-island/story-e6frg19l-1225832999056 And here is a report relating to an asbestos incident on Barrow Island (that would have threatened animals as much as workers): http://www.tlcwa.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1235:asbestos-bungle-on-barrow&catid=131:top-1 It should be noted that the EPA has back-flipped on its original recommendations as reported prior to the Barrow Island Act of 2003 in which it advised against the use of Barrow Island for the Gorgon Project due to the serious risk of incontrovertible damage to the island's unique and fragile ecosystem. One can only wonder why that advice was ignored and ponder why the EPA now supports the clearing of the extra 32 hectares, albeit with conditions attached including a 10% increase in environmental offsets that Chevron has no intention of honouring. Chevron has a reputation for damaging fragile environments all over the world in its relentless pursuit of fossil fuels. It was a mistake to give them the go ahead to operate the Gorgon Project on Barrow Island in the first place. The clearing of a further 32 hectares will inevitably prove an even bigger error of judgment. Expansion of gas, oil and coal projects in Australia equals expansion of widespread environmental damage. State and Federal parliaments should be urged to withdraw support from fossil fuel projects and focus instead on environmentally friendly and cost effective alternative energy sources. The photo on this page is courtesy of Bob Winters.
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    Created by Lucinda Marty
  • Change 26 Jan to Commemoration Day and 1 Sep to Australia Day for all Australians
    Yesterday I heard on the radio news that a highly regarded Indigenous Elder refused to accept his Australia Day Award. That was perfect timing for me as I have been trying to change Australia Day for the past 5 years. When I was in year 12 in 1971, my maths teacher invited me to a week long camp at Lane Cove National Park, Sydney. I did not realise what sort of camp it was initially. I soon learnt that it was the yearly camp to reunite Indigenous siblings who were still being separated and living with different White families. I made many friends there and reflected that had my cousins been born into a family with an Indigenous mother, they too would have been taken away to live with White families. I still live with the shock of what that week was about to this very day. It tore at my heart to try to comfort two precious sisters who were about to be separated again for another LONG year. That was something I have NEVER forgotten. The camp was pervaded with PANIC that last day. I feel that we all need a Commemorative Day on 26 January. There is still much healing to be allowed and this day will also include minority groups such as mine - complex trauma, people from war-torn countries, and even asylum seekers who are feeling political unrest and torture. We all carry traumatic memories that need time to heal and given the respect of the nation to give us this day each year on 26 January.We need a national, inclusive Commemoration Day on 26 January to be dedicated to the memories of all the events that brought/bring/will bring the original generations of the First Peoples in Australia, the invaders and their generations of offspring, more recent migrants and their families, and asylum seekers together to actively remember the actions of past others and to celebrate the survival of all minority groups against enormous odds. Then we need to bring everyone together into the present time with an all inclusive Australia Day on 1 September, the first day of Spring. Then and only then will Australians be able to start growing up emotionally.
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    Created by Lucy Adams